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Effective Decision-Making

Effective Decision-Making

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Effective Decision-Making refers to team members practicing a transparent decision-making process that is informed by the minimum number of relevant perspectives. There are three main styles of decision-making:

  1. Autocratic: One person, usually the leader, decides with minimal input from team members, who are expected to comply with the decision.
  2. Consultative: With input from the team, and process support from a Single Journey owner, a call is made by a designated decision- maker and communicated with clear rationale. Although agreement may be desired, alignment will be expected. A decision analysis process may be used to structure this alignment conversation. To achieve alignment, it may be necessary to clarify a date or other conditions for when it will be okay for team members to revisit the decision.
  3. Consensus: All team members are involved in agreeing on a course of action (majority rule). Individual team members may have veto power. Once the decision is reached, all team members are expected to comply.

Growth River’s experience with many different teams shows that the decision-making style that allows a team to become high performing is somewhere between consultative and autocratic. Ideally, the team leader has the authority to make critical decisions but does so with input from team members—as it makes the logic and rationale for decisions transparent. See Decision Analysis. This links to the Activating Purpose crucial conversation.

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